Marketing Group Best Practices

Proven Marketing Department Leading Practices to Adopt

  • Best Practices (#77) / Marketing / Programs & Campaigns

    Best Practice (Good)
    Make sure that marketing and sales teams collaborate openly on product marketing strategies in order to improve both the quality and volume of leads being passed to sales employees from marketing campaigns.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Have marketing and sales employees come up with and execute their own separate marketing programs and campaigns.
    Benefits: Marketing and sales planning collaboration increases promotional effectiveness, decreases wasted marketing expenses and reduces frustration on both ends. By gathering feedback from sales staff, the Marketing Group can craft campaigns that bring in higher quality leads at the correct point in the purchasing cycle.
  • Best Practices (#78) / Marketing / Programs & Campaigns

    Best Practice (Good)
    Provide frequent (monthly/quarterly) sales-based feedback and insights to marketing teams for each campaign launched to examine tweaks or additions that can be made to improve conversion rate and lead quality.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Have Marketing launch large campaigns and programs. Discourage the Marketing Team from adjusting their campaigns based on actual results.
    Benefits: Frequently measuring campaigns and gathering practical feedback from sales staff can improve campaign effectiveness and decrease wasted time and money related to ineffective marketing initiatives.
  • Best Practices (#79) / Marketing / Programs & Campaigns

    Best Practice (Good)
    Ensure that campaign quality requirements are defined from the start of the project, and define exactly what ‘quality’ means to the customer.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Continuously monitor campaign quality throughout the development process, and rely on the expertise of the Marketing staff.
    Benefits: Creates strict guidelines for campaign quality and forces Marketing staff to look at quality from the customer’s perspective.
  • Best Practices (#80) / Marketing / Branding & Strategy

    Best Practice (Good)
    Work with marketing campaign managers and digital marketing teams to setup a testing program that uses internal employees as ‘customers’ for the initial testing of new advertising materials and campaigns.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Use external customers, focus groups and other third party resources to gather feedback on advertising/marketing materials and campaigns.
    Benefits: Using employees as test subjects can reduce costs associated with user testing and provides marketing employees with immediate feedback on marketing materials and content.
  • Best Practices (#81) / Marketing / Branding & Strategy

    Best Practice (Good)
    Work with marketing campaign managers and research staff to ensure that all marketing initiatives have a set of pre-defined performance metrics. Install a subset of metrics that are common to all campaigns in order to meaningfully compare performance across campaigns.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Allow marketing campaign managers and research staff to set metrics for campaigns as they see fit, without ensuring that they are: 1) designed to provide actionable information, and 2) allow for the comparison of performance against previous campaigns and programs.
    Benefits: Establishing standardized marketing metrics and reporting cycles allows marketing teams to gain insights on the performance of their campaigns, and adjust accordingly. Furthermore, using a common set of metrics enables apples-to-apples benchmarking across past and present marketing initaitives.
  • Best Practices (#82) / Marketing / Digital Marketing

    Best Practice (Good)
    When performing on-page search engine optimization (SEO), use a checklist covering 5 major aspects to assess each page: URL structure (simple, easy to read), keyword use (in h1, title tag and first paragraph), mobile-friendliness (responsive design), sharing capability and page load speed.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Devote the majority of on-page search engine optimization efforts to keyword use. Pay little or no attention to other aspects of page content and design, such as URL simplicity, mobile usability and sharing features.
    Benefits: Using a simple checklist to assess five major SEO-related componenets of each page narrows your focus and can improve the likelihood of achieving higher search engine rankings.
  • Best Practices (#83) / Marketing / Digital Marketing

    Best Practice (Good)
    Perform A/B email campaign testing to assess the performance (open rate, click rate, leads generated, etc.) of email subject lines, from names and content. Adjust campaigns continuously based on the results.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Test the performance of each email campaign (content, subject line, etc.) based on basic metrics, such as open rate, click rate and leads generated. Adjust subsequent campaigns based on the findings.
    Benefits: Conducting email campaign A/B testing provides marketing managers with actionable data from a single marketing campaign. Adjusting campaigns rapidly based on findings from A/B tests can improve open/click rates, leads generated and sales.
  • Best Practices (#84) / Marketing / Digital Marketing

    Best Practice (Good)
    Automate only certain, non-customer facing social media activities (such as internal reporting or email notifications).
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Automate any and all possible social media activities in order to reduce the amount of effort devoted to social media campaign management.
    Benefits: Keeping automation to a minimum maintains the ‘human element’ and prevents the audience from thinking that your account is being run by a robot. Effective engagement through social media requires swift responses to events, such as replies, comments, retweets, etc.
  • Best Practices (#85) / Marketing / Marketing Research & Analysis

    Best Practice (Good)
    Differentiate “need to know” vs. “want to know” for research projects. Develop a framework to determine the type and scope of research required to answer the "need to know" requests.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Accept research requests from the marketing team, and go above and beyond to thoroughly produce reports in exhaustive detail.
    Benefits: Managing research and report requests in this fashion keeps reports concise and meaningful, while freeing up marketing research staff to perform additional, value-added research.
  • Best Practices (#86) / Marketing / Marketing Research

    Best Practice (Good)
    When conducting marketing-related research, define research objectives explicitly through contact with report end users. Validate research requirements with those users before diving into research and report development.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Perform marketing research and develop reports based on ad hoc requests from marketing managers and other staff. Go through several loops of feedback and adjustments with report end users to create the desired report content.
    Benefits: Explicitly establishing report objectives with stakeholders before jumping head-first into the research itself can improve report usefulness and reduce the number of iterations required to create an acceptable report (reduce report creation cycle time).
  • Best Practices (#87) / Marketing / Marketing Research

    Best Practice (Good)
    Create a standardized survey for management to assess the content and usefulness of each marketing-related report.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Use an ad hoc, one-off method to amend and improve marketing reports, making changes on the fly based on informal requests.
    Benefits: Reduces cost related to reporting by consolidating and, sometimes, eliminating redundant or useless reports. Also frees up marketing analysts to work on other tasks.
  • Best Practices (#88) / Marketing / Product Management

    Best Practice (Good)
    Include revenue improvement projections, anticipated intangible benefits and proposed workload requirements in all proposed marketing initiatives.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Assess proposed marketing initiatives based mostly on the expertise and "gut feelings" of the Product Management and Marketing teams.
    Benefits: Ties hard data into proposed marketing initiatives and allows stakeholders to make smarter, more informed decisions.
  • Best Practices (#89) / Marketing / Product Management

    Best Practice (Good)
    During the product research and development (R&D) phase, implement rigorous milestones that restrict the continuation of a project unless it meets certain defined success criteria.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Cancel early-stage R&D projects only if the cost exceeds certain defined budgetary limitations or moves beyond a defined timeframe.
    Benefits: The implementation of milestones reduces the cost of failure by setting up controls early on in the stage-gate process. The goal is not to prevent failure but to ensure that the majority of failed projects are terminated before a substantial amount of capital is expended.
  • Best Practices (#90) / Marketing / Product Management

    Best Practice (Good)
    Use historical data and lessons learned from past product launches to guide the post-launch review process for new products and identify trends that can be helpful in adjusting to certain economic conditions or customer feedback.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Minimize the focus on analyzing data and trends from past launches as management shifts their focus to new products and services.
    Benefits: Using historical data ensures analysts have a groundwork when setting goals for product performance and crunching related data, instead of starting from scratch. Also helps to identify product launch trends and how a company can use historical data to influence future decisions.
  • Best Practices (#91) / Marketing / Content Management

    Best Practice (Good)
    In addition to allowing users to share through social media, implement a simple form that allows users to share your content through email.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Create clear calls to action enticing users to share your content to social media platforms.
    Benefits: Offering a user-friendly option to share content via email facilitates personal communication and can lead to more visits/pageviews. Many users are reluctant to share content to social media due to a lack of familiarity with social media platforms, or simply because they do not want all of their follwers to see what they are sharing.
  • Best Practices (#92) / Marketing / Content Management

    Best Practice (Good)
    Use traffic (pageviews, time on page, etc.) and user engagement data (comments, shares) to prioritize content creation efforts. Glean ideas and strategies from your most popular content and apply them to new materials.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Prioritize your content creation efforts based around gaps in current content and new/existing product offerings and marketing campaigns.
    Benefits: Using hard data to prioritize content creation (by subject, format, medium, etc.) ensures that you are pushing out material that is valued by your user base.
  • Best Practices (#93) / Marketing / Public Relations (PR)

    Best Practice (Good)
    Notify media outlets of a new story or product launch 3-4 months in advance of the desired publishing date.
    Typical Practice (Bad)
    Notify media outlets of a new story or product launch when the event is close to taking place (1 month or less from launch).
    Benefits: Notifying media outlets of upcoming product launches and/or programs 3-4 months in advance improves relations with media outlets and increases the chances of a piece being published on time.

Looking for a custom solution?

OpsDog’s remote analytical team can provide custom, high quality data, reports and analysis for your organization with low cost and risk. Custom solutions include:

Questions?Call: 844-650-2888Email: info@opsdog.com

Let's find a solution that works for you. Fill out the form below and an OpsDog team member will contact you shortly to learn more about your needs...

Need help?
Call: 844-650-2888
Email: info@opsdog.com
TOTAL:
Tax will be calculated in the purchase step.
Continue to Payment
Please login to continue your purchase
Need help?
Call: 844-650-2888
Email: info@opsdog.com
Need help?
Call: 844-650-2888
Email: info@opsdog.com
Back to Top